Looking Back: Franklin County’s history December 6th

Franklin County’s history

Take a look back at Franklin County’s history through news and photos that appeared in local newspapers 25, 50, and 100 years ago on December 6th.

25 Years Ago 

December6, 1995Wednesday

“ Many Ways to Observe Christmas” 

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The magic glow of Christmas reflects in many corners of the world.  

In Jamaica’s country towns, local groups celebrate the holiday season by dressing in rags, feathered headdresses, and black masks with features-outlined in white.  They dance and shout to an African rhythm of drums and flutes, brandishing wooden spears and axes.   

The festive and religious aura of Yuletide begins December 16 in the Philippines.  At 4 a.m., church bells announce early morning services. Afterward, families decorate the windows of their homes with rainbow-hued paper and bamboo lanterns, the National Geographic Society says.  

On the same day in Mexico, houses are readied to receive visitors who with the family enact the drama of Mary and Joseph seeking lodging in Bethlehem.  On each night for nine nights family members or guest walk from room to room knocking on doors.  Hardhearted “innkeepers” refuse them entrance.  But on Christmas Eve doors are flung wide.  Candles blaze and all sing the praises of the Lord. Children smash the pinata, a hollow pottery animal figure that showers them with gifts and candy.  

Christians in Iran fast from the first of December.  They eat no meat, milk, or eggs until the fast is broken with a splendid meal on Christmas Eve.   

Most holiday diners relish fancy foods, but Armenians favor boiled spinach.  They believe that the Virgin Mary ate the greens the night before the birth of Christ. 

Englishmen of the Middle Ages set the style for lavish Yule feasts.  At one Christmas dinner.  King Henry III served up 600 oxen.  His guests finished off the meal with salmon pie and roast peacock, washing it down with brew from a wassail bowl bobbing with apples, toast, and roast crabs. 

Sweden begin the reason with tray to each bedside and brightens each dark room, symbolizing the light that will soon lengthen the days.  The ceremony begins a month-long holiday-season.   

On January 13 the Christmas tree is lit for the last time with the wish: “May God bless your Christmas, may it last till Easter.” 

50 Years Ago   

December6,1970Suday

“WITH THE DEER SLAYERS”  

The Mercersburg Club killed two deer In the Caledonia section; one on the first day and one on the third day of the season.  The Young Fayetteville Club killed four on Friday and Saturday near Caledonia.  Mr. Mc-Gowan of Hollywell Avenue killed a six-prong buck, 160 pounds, near Caledonia. 

100 Years Ago  

December6,1920Monday

Over 1500 Vote Nay and This Kills The Project 

 FRICK CO. STOCK HOLDERS DEFEAT. E.-B. MERGER PLAN” 

Because a majority of the stockholders in Frick Company are of the opinion that the present time is not the proper one to branch out and make changes in business which require the expenditure of considerable sums of money, the proposition submitted to its stockholders that the Frick light-line be sold to a new corporation was defeated at a meeting of the shareholders today.  

This action means that for the present, at least, the deal to take over the Emerson – Brantingham plant is off.   Under the law the vote of one stockholder against a proposition to sell stock kills whatever plan or that nature may be in “consideration.  

It may be possible that later, when money is more free and general trade conditions better, the E.-B. matter may be again taken up.  but at the moment there is no hope.   

The decision, of yesterday means a considerable loss to the community.  It was planned, if the proposition had been accepted, to commence stock taking at the E..B. plant Monday morning, and by December 15 it would have been In full operation under the new management.  

More men would have been employed than  it Is probable the E.-B. company will work In 1921.  

D. Norris Benedict presided at the meeting Saturday. W. R. Snivelv acted as secretary.  The tellers were H. B. Rinehart, S.S. Snively and E. J. King.  

In excess of 13,000 shares were voted in favor of the new project and 1,566 shares against it. 


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